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The Medicine Show

Un nuovo megapost elettorale!

andanteconmoto:

Siamo nel 2014: è l’anno della protesta, del fare rumore, della politica ad alta voce, dei vaffanculo e dell’essere contro (qualcuno era comunista perché chi era contro era comunista, cit.). Gli italiani odiano l’Europa, i greci odiano l’Europa, gli spagnoli ed i francesi…

s-h-e-e-r:

Panopticon Prison Arnhem by Foto Martien on Flickr.
Inside of the “Koepelgevangenis” (Dome or Panopticon Prison”) in Arnhem, the Netherlands.
The panopticon is a type of prison building originally designed by the English philosopher Jeremy Bentham in 1785. The panopticon was intended to be a prison that allowed the guard to observe any of the inmates without them knowing if and when they were being watched. The design features a central platform surrounded by a ring of cells - thus enabling a clear view of every prisoner.Worldwide are about 25 panopticon-inspired prisons built, in the Netherlands 3.The panopticon (Koepelgevangenis) in Arnhem is a cylinder, 55 meter (180 feet) in diameter, composed of 4 layers of 50 cells (200 at the most), topped by a dome that is 46 meter (150 feet) at its highest point. Built in 1880-1886 for solitary confinement, with an observation tower in the centre. Recently-renovated in 1995. 

s-h-e-e-r:

Panopticon Prison Arnhem by Foto Martien on Flickr.

Inside of the “Koepelgevangenis” (Dome or Panopticon Prison”) in Arnhem, the Netherlands.

The panopticon is a type of prison building originally designed by the English philosopher Jeremy Bentham in 1785. The panopticon was intended to be a prison that allowed the guard to observe any of the inmates without them knowing if and when they were being watched. The design features a central platform surrounded by a ring of cells - thus enabling a clear view of every prisoner.
Worldwide are about 25 panopticon-inspired prisons built, in the Netherlands 3.
The panopticon (Koepelgevangenis) in Arnhem is a cylinder, 55 meter (180 feet) in diameter, composed of 4 layers of 50 cells (200 at the most), topped by a dome that is 46 meter (150 feet) at its highest point. Built in 1880-1886 for solitary confinement, with an observation tower in the centre. Recently-renovated in 1995.
 

(via fabforgottennobility)

shotofpatr0n:

If you do not like what I post - unfollow.  I’m not holding you here.  This is my space (ha) where I can post what I like…how I like.  Take this:

and move on.

seshepherd:

The biggest mystery from last night’s episode of True Detective: Why did Reggie Ledoux have a tattoo of Matthew McConaughey’s face on his chest?

seshepherd:

The biggest mystery from last night’s episode of True Detective: Why did Reggie Ledoux have a tattoo of Matthew McConaughey’s face on his chest?

Desert Pirates by Sergi Brosa

(Source: lovechildstudios, via 3nding)

theremina:

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theremina:

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(Source: melaniesgone, via wilwheaton)

theletters2juliet:

 “Remember: the time you feel lonely is the time you most need to be by yourself. Life’s cruelest irony.” 
-Douglas Coupland, “Shampoo Planet”

theletters2juliet:

 “Remember: the time you feel lonely is the time you most need to be by yourself. Life’s cruelest irony.”

-Douglas Coupland, “Shampoo Planet”

(via nipresa)

mercurialblonde:

wolvensnothere:

batmanandsobbin:

richmondlee:

Congratulations to Tokyo for winning the bid to host the 2020 Olympics, just as Akira predicated over 20 years ago!


#what a good idea everyone we did it nothing can go wrong


And all that fresh radiation around there, and everything! What could go wrong!!!!!!!

Between this and Shirow predicting the future of Syria….time to reread all 80s manga and know all of the futures!

mercurialblonde:

wolvensnothere:

batmanandsobbin:

richmondlee:

Congratulations to Tokyo for winning the bid to host the 2020 Olympics, just as Akira predicated over 20 years ago!

And all that fresh radiation around there, and everything! What could go wrong!!!!!!!

Between this and Shirow predicting the future of Syria….time to reread all 80s manga and know all of the futures!

(via otomblr)

symphonies-of-the-overdosed:

youlovelucie:

adamhowardcross:

The comfiest cinemas in the world?

  1. TGV Beanie in Malaysia
  2. Blitz Megaplex in Jakarta, Indonesia
  3. Electric Cinema in London England
  4. Paragon Cineplex in Bangkok

holy crap there need to be more of these everywhere

there’s one of these in london what?!

(via 3nding)

paintaloosa:

All right, here’s my contribution to the art tutorial infographic world, part 1 of 2.  I’ve noticed that even in professional illustration, so often the humans and environments and armor and whatnot is really, really great— correct anatomy, lighting, proportions, like ‘wow this is fantastic WAIT what is up with that HORSE?’

I suspect two things;

First is that I spend 15 hours a day, 365 days a year looking, touching, handling, and just generally being around horses.  

Second is that most people do not.  

Artists have lost touch with their connection to horses as contemporary society has lost touch with them.  Generally, we don’t have that constant presence of horses in our lives that previous generations did, as horses aren’t part of the everyday landscape any more.  They don’t work the fields, they don’t cart the goods, they don’t deliver the mail or transport you to the next town down the road.

However, we still see horses all the time— in movies, books, illustration, ads and logos, we are presented with the image of horses all the time.  So we assume ‘yes, I have seen horses often and I know what they look like.’  Because of our exposure, we as artists don’t always feel like we need to heavily reference the animals as if we were drawing something we don’t see everyday (say, like elephants or giraffes or sea cucumbers).  Our brain just kind of plugs in ‘horse shaped’ and we go with that.

And I suspect that ends up being where a lot of these common mistakes occur.  Dogs are familiar, but we can easily find a dog to draw from live, to see the way the shapes of its face are put together in 3-dimensions.  Cats, humans, birds… if we venture just a little ways outside our studios (or in some cases, inside), we can find live models to study easily.  

You can’t really do that with horses.  They’re a commodity, sequestered away behind fences on private farms and shuttered away in barns.   So few people really get the chance to be up close and have that hands-on experience to really learn how a horse is put together.

So here’s some things, based on my own experience both drawing and working with horses, that might help you if you find yourself needing to draw one for yourself.

The approach I took might be more complicated than absolutely necessary, but I tried to present the subject of ‘how to draw horses’ a little differently than I’ve seen it done before.  I hope someone finds it understandable, and more importantly, helpful!

If you share this, please don’t delete my commentary about it above. Thanks :3

(via 3nding)

(Source: whisplash, via brondybux)